Do Prosthetic Eyes Move?

The procedures used today to duplicate the anatomy of the ocular orbit are exact replicas with a direct alginate impression. Any movement in the ocular orbit is transferred to the prosthetic eye with this method.

The wax form duplicating the parameters of the ocular orbit is fabricated and placed on the mold once the trial fitting is accepted after the trial fitting in the ocular orbit.

The mold of the ocular orbit is replicated in stone and the wax form is invested for a final curing mold.

The wax form is removed and replaced with acrylic (methyl-methacrylate), and heat cured to form a hard rigid form, that becomes the integral part of the final finished prosthesis. All proper cosmetics are applied and cured.

The finished product will sit on the face of the implant that was surgically imbedded in the ocular orbit; this implant will have encompassed around it the movement muscles and covered with the conjunctiva tissues. When the eyes move in conjunction with each other, the implanted orbit will follow the movement. With the prosthetic eye sitting upon the face of the implant, it will be pushed in the directions that are initiated by the natural eye. This is how the prosthetic eye gets its movement.

Movement is determined by the position and motility of the implant. This is only possible when the impression of the ocular orbit is correct and the wax form is properly seated to make a mold that replicates the natural ocular orbit.

MOVEMENT can only be ATTAINED WHEN AN IMPLANT IS PROPERLY POSITIONED IN THE OCULAR ORBIT BY THE OPERATING PHYSCIAN.

When an eye maker follows protocol in the manufacturing of a Prosthetic Eye as mentioned in the above technique, he will get MAXIMUM movement transferred to the Prosthesis.